Resumes

Updating your resume is about as pleasant as a trip to the dentist. It is among the most dreaded tasks for many people. When you need a current resume, you typically don’t have time to focus on it. It’s also difficult to summarize years of work into a few bullets or a paragraph.

 

Recognizing you need help is the first step toward recovery.

 

Not Your Father’s Resume Service

 

Unlike other companies, Cary Communications doesn’t just take your existing resume and make it “look pretty.” We talk with you about your career aspirations and focus on highlighting your unique skills in a way that will rule you “in” rather than “out” for any job that you seek.

 

Our expertise with Applicant Tracking Systems (ATS) means you won’t have to worry that a robot will toss your resume into the trash. We know ATS lingo, which will give you an edge.

 

We can implement standard layouts and formats, but we also develop unique approaches such as visual resumes that showcase your experience across a timeline that includes images or an infographic that highlights particular stats.

 

Since most people cringe when they think about updating their resume, we take the pain out of it by doing it for you.

 

Invest in Yourself

 

People often invest lots of money on a new interview suit, shoes, briefcase, portfolio, etc., but don’t invest in their most important marketing collateral: their resume and online profiles.

 

Think of it this way: if you’re unemployed and previously earned a salary of $100K per year, that’s $400 per day or $2,000 per week of unemployment. The payback from using professional services is considerable. Plus, you can deduct job-hunting expenses on your taxes.

 

Make an investment in your future success and happiness.

 

You may also be interested in this: What is the best way to update my resume? 

 

Our Resume Process

Many resume services simply add details from your most recent role, change the typeface and format, and perform simple edits.

At Cary Communications, we offer a more in-depth service that’s customized to your needs:

  1. Exploratory session – Discuss your career goals, job changes, favorite and least-favorite tasks, and any other aspects of what you’re trying to achieve, whether you’re unemployed, freelancing or working full-time.
  2. Interview – Question and answer session to explore your career history from beginning to end, tracing the evolution that brought you to where you are now. Uncover special skills, expertise and accomplishments you may have forgotten, and quantify any success metrics from prior experiences.
  3. Draft – Cary Communications creates a draft resume for your review.
  4. Feedback – You provide feedback on the draft resume, indicate changes, additions or deletions. Three rounds of feedback are included.
  5. Final – You receive both an editable version of your resume as well as a PDF to send to others. That preserves the formatting so your resume looks just as great to everyone else as it does to you.

We archive all resumes, so if you ever lose your original or want to update it, it’s easy to do. As you update your resume yourself, feel free to send us a copy so we can store your latest version in our archive. In addition, as time goes on, many people want to update their resumes to include future roles. We make the process as painless as possible.

What’s the difference between a resume and a CV?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The term resume comes from the French word résumé, meaning summarized. It’s intended to distill your experience and qualifications into a page or two for quick scanning.

 

Some people use the term interchangeably, but that’s incorrect. A resume is a concise summary of your skills, experience and education. A curriculum vitae (CV), loosely translated as “the course of my life,” is longer, includes more details, and is used primarily in academic and scientific environments. It would include specific research, publications, awards, certifications, etc. (e.g. when applying for a professorship, fellowship or grant).

 

The term “CV” is standard in the Europe, the Middle East, Africa and Asia, it is used more frequently worldwide than the term “resume.” A CV often includes “personal” details that Americans might find surprising, such as date/place of birth, citizenship, visa status, marital status, spouse’s and children’s names, a photograph and salary information, depending on location.

 

While a “resume” is currently the norm in the US, that is changing. Technology is enabling the world to standardize globally. Since most large corporations have global locations, and since the term “CV” is the standard in more countries, it is used more frequently throughout the world than the term “resume.” If you apply for a tech job in Silicon Valley, don’t be surprised when they ask you for your CV. When they do, simply contact us at info@carycommunications.com.